Monday, February 25, 2008

The Palm Court Theatre Orchestra


I found this LP at a boot sale last year. Sadly the gate-fold sleeve has been stuck together after being left in the rain so trying to read the sleeve notes is made quite difficult. No information about them could be gleaned from the internet so as far as can make out they were formed in 1978 by Mr. Anthony Godwin, bass clarinettist with the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra. He had inherited a complete library of theatre music dating from 1880 to 1930 and it's from this that their repetoire is mainly drawn. They try and re-create the sound and atmostphere of those early days by using instruments of that era. For instance on the song "I'm Forever Blowing Bubbles" the soprano Linda Murray is accompanied by David Norton on the musical saw. Linda Murray also sings the other song featured here "Two Little Sausages" that I remember an old uncle of mine singing back in the 60's. This record was released in 1980 on the Chandos label.


Palm Court Theatre Orch. - Down In Zanzibar

Palm Court Theatre Orch. - The Ragtime Bass Player

Palm Court Theatre Orch. - Two Little Sausages

Palm Court Theatre Orch. - In A Persian Market


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3 comments:

M said...

Thank you very much for this delightful music!
By the way, David Norton, the musical saw player you mentioned, is from Dorset, UK. I am actually searching for his contact because I would like to invite him to the Musical Saw Festival in NYC...

All the best,

Saw Lady
www.SawLady.com/blog

wastedpapiers said...

Glad you like it Saw Lady. I hope you find Mr. Norton and accepts your offer. There can't be that many Musical Saw Festivals in the world- I've certainly not heard of any over here!

Brian Ridgway said...

Back in the 80's The Palm Court Theatre Orchestra would tour. Tour meant Guelph and Toronto, Canada.
One time after a wonderful concert there was a tea dance in the lobby of Roy Thompson Hall. After the tea dance the party carried on, some of the local musicians got involved and the evening went on until the wee hours. It became the best jazz ever. Three concerts in one evening.