Saturday, November 04, 2006

Jimmy McCracklin




Four tracks from side one of "Twist With Jimmy McCracklin" on the Crown Records label released in the early 60's I imagine at the height of the Twist craze.

1. I'm Gonna Tell Your Mother
2. My Mother Says
3. That Ain't Right
4. Please Forgive

Wikipedia says of him-

"McCracklin was born in St. Louis, Missouri. He joined the United States Navy in 1938 following a successful run as an amateur boxer.
McCracklin began recording after World War II. His first recordings were released by Globe Records in 1945. He formed the Blues Blasters in 1946. His first recording under his name were on the Trilon Records label in 1948.
He recorded on many labels in ensuing years, including Swing Time Records in 1951, Peacock Records in 1952, as well as Modern Records, Irma Records, and Gedinson's Records."

Discover more about Jimmy McCracklin HERE.


Jimmy McCracklin - You Don't Seem To Understand

Jimmy McCracklin - Reelin' & Rockin' Twist


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7 comments:

spice-the-cat said...

Nice to hear these tracks. Is there a personnel listing on the sleeve? I'm going to stick my neck out and say it sounds like Jimmy Reed on harmonica

Crown Records was the budget label of Modern Records, owned by the Bihari Brothers and which was the Los Angeles equivalent of Chess Records in Chicago.

There's a nice write up and discography of Modern and it's subsidiary labels here.

http://www.bsnpubs.com/modern/modernstory.html

spice-the-cat said...

I'll try again with the link.

www.bsnpubs.com/modern/
modernstory.html

michael said...

Thanks for the LINK spice. Much appreciated.
No idea who is playing on these tracks. Little info on the sleeve.

Big Al said...

Mr Bland was the "Twist champion of Llanbradach" I'll have to play these to him.

michael said...

I used to be a bit of a twister too but gave it up to do the Funky Penguin.

Coffee Messiah said...

Great blues, Thanks!

Rolf said...

As I understand it these were single that Jimmy McCracklin did in the fifities, and the Bihari Bros. (Modern, RPM, other labels) rushed these into the market on their budget Crown label when the twist craze hit.